Indian male IT applicant with just 3 years of work experience cracks Columbia

Pranav was a part of an oversaturated applicant group, Indian Male IT applicants. He also just had 3 years of work experience. To score a great admit, Pranav desperately needed to stand out amongst the competition.

And he did! Pranav cracked Columbia, one of the best business schools in the world!

We were so glad that Pranav chose us to help him navigate his MBA applications. Here’s his story.

Pranav’s goals story

Pranav’s initial goals story took the cake for being vague. He had selected three domains to work in post-MBA. While an applicant has the full right to select any domain or function post-MBA, business school admissions committees want to know your current plan.

They want to know why you decided to start your MBA education. If you don’t have a clear goal, then how will you convince an admissions committee that an MBA from their school is the route to your goal?

He also needed to elaborate on incidents from the past couple of years that had motivated him to switch to his short-term goals, these are called the AHA moments.

Then he was supposed to move on to his current handicaps, i.e. the skills or knowledge that he currently lacked to perform his short-term goals with complete efficiency. After that came the part where Pranav must explain how an MBA would help him overcome his current handicaps.

When he added his transferable skills, i.e. the current set of skills that he had learnt through his past work-experience, it created a smooth transition from his current job to his short-term goal via an MBA.

Pranav was also provided with the necessary research material for his choice of function. That, in turn, helped him understand his current handicaps much better, and list stronger reasons for the question “Why MBA?”

Pranav’s essay analysis

An important part about the instances Pranav shared in his essays was the narration, his narration did not include the “Why should you care about this incident?” part. He wasn’t explaining to the admissions committee, why some things were a huge accomplishment to him, or why they mattered to him.

While it is okay in normal life, when you allow people to formulate their own opinions and let them derive their own conclusions, you don’t want to do so during MBA admissions.

This uncertainty could play severely against you, and thus Pranav also had to rectify this error, and he very well did.

It wasn’t just a proud moment for Pranav, but also us when he shared the news of his acceptance to Columbia’s MBA program.

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