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GRE Training Related Questions

Question1: Question: What is the duration of the GRE course at PythaGURUS.?

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Answer: It is a 60 hour program and the students have the flexibility to join both weekday and the weekend batches. The regular batches run for 10 weeks with two classes every week and the fast track batches run for 5 weeks with 4 classes every week. Register for our free Demo session to learn more about our teaching style, and the class structure.
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Question2: What If I miss a class?

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Answer: Every center has multiple batches going on for GRE. Please check with the center manager at your location to find out the schedule of other parallel batches to attend the class/classes that you missed.
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Question3: What does the curriculum look like?

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Answer: PythaGURUS has a very well defined curriculum that comprises of the questions representing the latest trends on the GRE exam. In addition, most of the questions in the official guide, and other official sources are not reflective of the tough questions that students face in the real exam. PythaGURUS has its own repository of questions that will allow the students to experience the real rigor of the test
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Question4: How can I attend a Demo class?

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Answer: You can register online for a demo session or call up any of our helpline numbers, and check the Demo class schedules. The demo class will give you an opportunity to learn about our teaching methodology, our course architecture, and the depth of our curriculum. You will also be able to experience a live classroom environment at PythaGURUS.
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Question5: What if I am a working professional and cannot attend weekday classes?

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Answer: Our GRE Weekend program is meant especially for the working professionals. We do take into account your work schedules. We generally start two batches in a calendar month. Please register for a Demo or call up any of our office numbers enquire more about the batch plan.
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Exam Related Questions

Question6: What is the process for registering for the computer-based GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: In order to register for the computer-based GRE new and revised General Test online, either by phone, or by mail or fax. For more information, please visit the official ETS Website.
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Question7: What is the process for registering for the paper-based GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: The paper-based administrations are valid only in those only areas of the world wherever computer-based testing is unavailable. In order to register for the paper-based GRE revised General Test, you can sign up or online or through mail. For additional information, please visit the official ETS Website.
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Question8: How can I find the format of test (computer-based test or paper-based) offered in my region?

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Answer: In order to see the test format offered in your region, please visit the official ETS Website.
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Question9: How can I find the format of test (computer-based test or paper-based) offered in my region?

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Answer: In order to see the test format offered in your region, please visit the official ETS Website.
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Question10: Is admission ticket mandatory?

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Answer: You will only require an admission ticket if you are appearing for the paper-based test. Your admission ticket should reach you just about three weeks after you have registered for the test. In order to view and print your ticket online, please visit the official ETS Website. In case you do not get you admission ticket 10 days before the date of the test, you can print your ticket online or get in touch with ETS right away to verify your test center assignment.
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Question11: When am I supposed to register for the test?

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Answer: It is advisable to register early as test centers get filled up early. If you register beforehand, you get a chance to get your ideal test location and date selection. For details on cut-off date of paper based administrations, please visit the official ETS Website.
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Question12: is the process for changing the date or location of my test?

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Answer: You are allowed to reschedule within the same testing year (July 1 – June 30). You ought to reschedule or call off your test registration no later than three full days prior to your test date (does not include the day of your test or the day of your application) or you can lose your test fee. In case you plan to reschedule your test date, there will be a rescheduling fee US$50 charged to you. In case you cancel your test, you stand to get a reimbursement equal to half of your initial test fee. In case of a computer-based testing, cancellation or rescheduling can be done online. In order to change your test center, please get in touch with the GRE Program by the registration deadline.
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Question13: is the provision for asking nonstandard testing accommodation?

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Answer: ETS stands committed in helping test takers with disabilities and other health-related issues by providing assistance and affordable accommodations that are suitable given the intention of the test. For availing nonstandard testing accommodations, you must meet the ETS requirements. For more information about nonstandard accommodation, please visit the official EST website.
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Question14: is the duration of GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: For the computer-based test, the total time of the test is about three hours and 45 minutes, and includes short breaks. For more information on time and task for each section, please visit the official EST website. Visit the official EST website for details on timing and tasks for paper based test as well.
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Question15: is the use of on-screen calculator in the test?

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Answer: ETS has incorporated an on-screen calculator to be utilized in the Quantitative Reasoning section to decrease the prominence on computation and to concentrate more attention on reasoning skills. There are a total of four functions (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) in the calculator and a square root. In paper-based tests, the calculators are made available at the test center to be used during the test. You may want to avoid bringing your own calculator.
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Question16: In case of questions with multiple answers, if I manage to get one of the correct answers, do I stand to obtain partial credit?

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Answer: For questions that have multiple answers, all the selections ought to be correct so as to receive credit for answering the question appropriately.
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Question17: do I score in the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: Computer-based Test:

For computer based test, the measures are section-level adaptive for Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning. It implies that the computer chooses the second section of a measure based on the accomplishment on the first section. In each section, all questions add equally to the total score. For both the measures, a raw score is computed, which implies the number of questions answered in the correct manner.

Then, the raw score is converted to a scaled score by means of a process known as equating. The equating process accounts for small variations in complexity among the different test editions plus the differences in complexity amongst individuals’ tests established by the section-level adaptation. Thus, a given scaled score shows roughly the same level of accomplishment in spite of of which section was selected and when the test was undertaken.

Paper-based Test:

The process of scoring of the Verbal and Quantitative in a paper-based General Test is a two-step process: Firstly, a raw score is calculated. The raw score reflects the number of questions the test taker has answered correctly. Secondly, the raw score is converted to a scaled score by means of a process known as equating. The equating accounts for variations in complexity among the different test editions. Therefore, a given scaled score shows approximately the equivalent level of ability in spite of of the edition of the test that was taken. To get more details on scoring in the test, please visit the official EST website.
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Question18: What adds to the final score on the computer-based GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: It is both the level of complexity of the second section of each measure as well as the number of correctly answered questions across the two sections that add to the final score for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures.
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Question19: How do I score in the Analytical Writing section of the GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: The scoring process for the Analytical Writing section of the GRE revised General Test is similar for both the computer-based and paper-based tests. Or each essay, you receive a score from two trained readers by means of a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are qualified to give scores on the basis of the quality of an essay in answer to the assigned task. In case the two scores vary by more than one point on the scale, the inconsistency is judged by a third GRE reader. Or else, the two scores on each essay are normalized by an average.

After this, the final scores on the two essays are averaged and rounded off to the nearest half-point interval on the 0-6 score scale. A single score is given for the Analytical Writing measure. The main stress in scoring the Analytical Writing section is on critical thinking and analytical writing skills and not much on grammar and mechanics.

Get more details about the scoring Analytical Writing section of the GRE revised General Test from the official EST website.
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Question20: Do I get to see my scores at the test center after taking the computer-based GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: After you complete the computer-based GRE revised General Test, you can see your unofficial scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures at the test center. Since the Analytical Writing essay scoring is a complex process, you cannot see your Analytical Writing score at the testing center. Your final scores will be mailed roughly 10 – 15 days subsequent to your test date.
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Question21: all scores will get reported on the GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: There are three scores that are reported on the GRE revised General Test:
A Verbal Reasoning, which is reported on a 130 – 170 score scale, in 1-point increments.
A Quantitative Reasoning score, which is reported on a 130 – 170 score scale, in 1-point increments.
An Analytical Writing, which is reported on a 0 – 6 score level, in half-point increments.
For more information on the scores reported, please visit the official EST website.
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Question22: do I receive my final official GRE revised General Test scores?

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Answer: If case you have taken the computer-based GRE revised General Test, it will take approximately 10-15 days after your test to get your final your official scores.

And for the paper-based test, it will take six weeks after your test date to get your final official scores.
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Question23: Is there an option to see my final official GRE revised General Test scores online?

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Answer: Of course, you can view your final official score online once reported. This facility is free of charge, for more information on the same; you can visit the official EST website.
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Question24: My final official score for the Verbal Reasoning or Quantitative Reasoning measures are remote of the scale of scores I anticipated, derived from the score ranges I saw at the test center. How is that possible?

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Answer: The score ranges made available at the test center to individuals who took the test before November 9, 2011, were unofficial rough approximations provided to give test takers an overall sense of their accomplishment on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures. The final official scores reported on the new 130 – 170 score scale are the precise indication of a test-taker’s performance on the GRE revised General Test.
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Question25: What is the process for institutions to evaluate scores on the GRE General Test administered prior to August with scores on the GRE revised General Test?

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Answer: As GRE scores hold valid for five years, it is possible that schools will receive score reports from applicants taking the new test, the prior test or both. The GRE program offer schools with with concordance information (PDF) to aid in comparing scores from the prior score scales (200 – 800) to the new score scales (130 – 170). For an individual, who took the test prior to August 1, 2011, concordance particulars are included on score reports (PDF) issued in November 2011 and beyond.
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Question26: I scored an 800 on the Quantitative section of the prior GRE General Test, but this only means a 166 on the new Quantitative Reasoning score scale. How is that possible?

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Answer: One advantage of altering to the new 130 – 170 score scale was to get better use of the entire score scale range. Let’s say, with the prior 200 – 800 score scale, individuals who scored 800 on the Quantitative Reasoning measure were grouped at the top of the scale with a percentile rank of 94. And with the new 130 – 170 score scale, high aptitude candidates will be spread across numerous points at the upper end for more demarcation. Therefore, a 166 on the new score scale stands for a percentile rank of 94, but EST can now differentiate candidates’ accomplishment at score points above a percentile rank of 94.

EST advises institutes to use broader criteria when appraising applicants during this transition period. For applicants who get Quantitative Reasoning scores of 800 on the prior GRE General Test, specially, we recommend institutions to use extra care in evaluating those applicants since they earned the maximum score achievable on that measure of the prior test.

You must bear in mind that concorded scores are approximates and do not essentially reflect scores test takers would get if they take the GRE revised General Test. Any individual who appeared in the prior GRE General Test and intends to have his/her real scores reported on the new 130 – 170 scale may prefer to take the GRE revised General Test at any time.
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Question27: I have seen that the concordance tables do not contain all of the scores on the new 130 – 170 score scales. Why is it so?

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Answer: The concordance tables give description for the scores on the prior 200 – 800 score scales, the new 130 – 170 score scales and the corresponding percentile ranks. In the new scale, only those scores that have a matching score on the prior scale are incorporated in the tables.
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Question28: What is the process for ordering the additional score reports?

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Answer: For ordering the additional score reports, you can go online, do it by a by phone, mail or fax. Get more information on additional score reports on the official EST website.
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Question29: Is there an option to cancel my scores?

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Answer: When you finish the test, you will have the choice to cancel your scores. You must remember that you cannot cancel your score for just one section of the test and have the scores stand valid for the remaining sections.

It is advisable to consider the option of cancelling your score very cautiously. Your scores will be sent to GRE score recipients only at your application. In case you decide to cancel your scores, they shall NOT be reported to you or any score recipients and no reimbursement will be made. Canceled scores are never added to your permanent record. If you plan to take the test yet again, you ought to reregister and submit a new test payment.

In case you view scores at a computer-based GRE revised General Test session, you do not have the option of cancelling them at a later date.
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Question30: Is there a process to reinstate my canceled scores?

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Answer: You will have to pay US$30 to reinstate your cancelled score. But you need to send the request for the same to EST within 60 days after your test date. You can also fax or mail a written request to GRE Services. Your request should contain your name, date of birth, daytime phone number, test date and registration number and payment. You can also specify up to four free score recipients while you reinstate your scores. To select score recipients, you must incorporate the apt institution codes (PDF) and department codes (PDF) and specify the scores you want sent.

You may decide to send only General Test scores, only Subject Test scores or both scores, but you might not decide to have only those scores from a specific test date reported. In case you do not choose score recipients at this time, you necessarily should pay US$23 per recipient to have scores sent at a later date.

The scores will be reinstated and reported roughly two weeks after your application for the computer-based revised General Test or on the estimated score report mailing date for the paper-based test. You will be mailed your scores and your designated score recipients shortly subsequently.
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